Home Troubleshooting For CPU & PC Components
Guide

Sd Card Uhs I Vs Uhs Ii: Discover The World Of High-speed Data Transfers

Isaac Lee is the lead tech blogger for Vtech Insider. With over 10 years of experience reviewing consumer electronics and emerging technologies, he is passionate about sharing his knowledge to help readers make informed purchasing decisions.

What To Know

  • However, if you are on a budget or you do not need the extra speed, then a UHS-I card will suffice.
  • However, if you are on a budget or you do not need the extra speed, then a UHS-I card will suffice.
  • However, if you are on a budget or you do not need the extra speed, then a UHS-I card will suffice.

Choosing the right SD card for your camera can be a daunting task, especially with the wide variety of options available. Two of the most common types of SD cards are UHS-I and UHS-II. In this blog post, we’ll compare and contrast these two types of SD cards to help you decide which one is right for you.

What is SD Card UHS-I?

UHS-I stands for Ultra High Speed Bus Interface. It is the first generation of the UHS bus interface and was introduced in 2010. UHS-I cards have a maximum theoretical speed of 104 MB/s. However, in real-world conditions, speeds are typically closer to 80-90 MB/s.

What is SD Card UHS-II?

UHS-II stands for Ultra High Speed Bus Interface II. It is the second generation of the UHS bus interface and was introduced in 2014. UHS-II cards have a maximum theoretical speed of 312 MB/s. However, in real-world conditions, speeds are typically closer to 250-280 MB/s.

UHS-I vs UHS-II: Speed Comparison

The most significant difference between UHS-I and UHS-II cards is their speed. UHS-II cards are significantly faster than UHS-I cards, both in terms of theoretical and real-world speeds.

UHS-I vs UHS-II: Compatibility

UHS-II cards are backward compatible with UHS-I devices. However, you will not be able to take advantage of the faster speeds of UHS-II cards if you use them in a UHS-I device.

UHS-I vs UHS-II: Price

UHS-II cards are typically more expensive than UHS-I cards. The price difference can vary depending on the brand, capacity, and speed of the card.

Which SD Card is Right for You?

The best SD card for you depends on your specific needs. If you need a fast SD card for shooting 4K video or burst photography, then you should choose a UHS-II card. However, if you are on a budget or you do not need the extra speed, then a UHS-I card will suffice.

Choosing the Right SD Card: Additional Considerations

In addition to speed, there are a few other factors to consider when choosing an SD card:

  • Capacity: SD cards come in a variety of capacities, from 8GB to 1TB. Choose a card that is large enough to store all of your photos and videos.
  • Brand: There are many different brands of SD cards available. Some of the most popular brands include SanDisk, Lexar, and Kingston. Do some research to find a brand that you trust.
  • Warranty: Most SD cards come with a warranty. The length of the warranty can vary from brand to brand. Choose a card with a warranty that gives you peace of mind.

What is the Final Verdict?

Ultimately, the best SD card for you depends on your specific needs and budget. If you need a fast SD card for shooting 4K video or burst photography, then you should choose a UHS-II card. However, if you are on a budget or you do not need the extra speed, then a UHS-I card will suffice.

Information You Need to Know

1. What is the difference between UHS-I and UHS-II SD cards?

UHS-II SD cards are faster than UHS-I SD cards. UHS-II cards have a maximum theoretical speed of 312 MB/s, while UHS-I cards have a maximum theoretical speed of 104 MB/s.

2. Are UHS-II SD cards backward compatible with UHS-I devices?

Yes, UHS-II SD cards are backward compatible with UHS-I devices. However, you will not be able to take advantage of the faster speeds of UHS-II cards if you use them in a UHS-I device.

3. Which SD card is right for me?

The best SD card for you depends on your specific needs. If you need a fast SD card for shooting 4K video or burst photography, then you should choose a UHS-II card. However, if you are on a budget or you do not need the extra speed, then a UHS-I card will suffice.

Was this page helpful?

Isaac Lee

Isaac Lee is the lead tech blogger for Vtech Insider. With over 10 years of experience reviewing consumer electronics and emerging technologies, he is passionate about sharing his knowledge to help readers make informed purchasing decisions.

Popular Posts:

Back to top button